Beau soleil, vraiment

as my mother bemaoned

the simplistic divisiblity

of the world into good and evil

i looked to the sunset

and wished i could touch the art.

As she lamented

the double standard for the right

i looked to write

about all that i have left

in my head,

alone.

As she rued

her stolen youth

i stretched my hand

into the beautiful sunset

to pull the light

and shine.

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How The Beautyful Ones Taught Me Perspective.

A masterpiece on a master, peace.
A masterpiece on a master, peace.

The silent observes should notice an enigmatic woman with hypnotic curves syncing with the groove of the soul, jazz samples. Notice how her full head of locked hair, with a life of its own, bobs to the rhythm of each kick. Her ravishing curves, masterfully gliding into the ambiance her accompaniment creates. Her eyes closed as her mind mellows into the cool, and the observer vicariously feel it too. Her arms, gently but purposefully, cutting through the space around her. How her arms wave, along with the waves, showing the observer the metaphysical synergy of rhythm and life. And just as the sound begins to ebbs into silence, she too begins to retreat, her souls admits defeat. The observe should see her with bright eyes and a big radiant simile take a seat, whilst her soul sulks and hopes the silence is repealed.

This a short excerpt form a much more elaborate project being created by yours truly. I have just been overwhelmingly inspired by Ayi Kwei Armah’s The Beautyful Ones Are Not Yet Born. Specifically his dynamic approach to narrative perspective. The abstract. Truly a work of art.

Neo-Colonialism, The Last Stage of Imperialism.

Capture

THE neo-colonialism of today represents imperialism in its final and perhaps its most dangerous stage.
In the past it was possible to convert a country upon which a neo-colonial regime had been imposed —
Egypt in the nineteenth century is an example — into a colonial territory. Today this process is no
longer feasible. Old-fashioned colonialism is by no means entirely abolished. It still constitutes an
African problem, but it is everywhere on the retreat. Once a territory has become nominally independent
it is no longer possible, as it was in the last century, to reverse the process. Existing colonies may linger
on, but no new colonies will be created. In place of colonialism as the main instrument of imperialism
we have today neo-colonialism.
The essence of neo-colonialism is that the State which is subject to it is, in theory, independent and has
all the outward trappings of international sovereignty. In reality its economic system and thus its
political policy is directed from outside.

Kwame Nkrumah (1965)

These are the opening paragraphs from Kwame Nkrumah’s Book on Neo-Colonialism which he aptly describes as the last stage of imperialism. This book is a very insightful read. Nkrumah highlights a lot of phenomena, that at that time might have seemed to be prophecies but in light of the current sociopolitical climate in sub-Saharan Africa, the truth.

I picked up this book out of sheer curiosity. I wanted to know why Nkrumah coined the phrase Neocolonialism and what necessitated it. What exactly neocolonialism was and how detrimental it is or was or will be to the Africa. published in 1965, Nkrumah really foreshadows a lot of. He was in every possible connotation of the word, a visionary. Enigmatic maybe.

You can disagree with the ideology, the methods, the persona, but you have to respect the knowledge at least. This is a must read for anyone wishing to understand the intricacies of post colonial politics on the African continent. Fifty years on, and this book still contains the possible solutions to problems we face in Africa today.

I look to engage anyone who has or is going to read this book. It is relatively short, but has a lot to offer both young and old minds.

Ghanaian history and art rediscovered: The need for national pride.

oil painting on exhibition
oil painting on exhibition

I have always been a huge admirer art, history, literature, music – you get the picture. So last Monday I decided to visit the National Museum of Ghana in Accra, Ghana. I went there because I was bored and I needed inspiration. I find it creatively refreshing to be in a different environment or to be surrounded by inspiring people or articles. The National Museum has been around for as long as Ghana has been independent, yet being a Ghanaian living in Ghana all my life, I have never heard much about it. The Kwame Nkrumah Mausoleum is far more popular than this is. I cannot explain why that is but I can speculate. Are Ghanaian selectively interested in just some aspects of their culture and history and not the whole? Well, that is not the focus of my post.
Scope of Gallery
There was so much history and art on not just Ghana, but the whole world on display! I was absolutely shocked circling the artefacts in the galleries. I found mosaic from Carthage, Ife Bronze statues from Nigeria, Actual human remains from archaeological digs in Ghana, terra-cotta figurines, ritual dolls, contemporary art pieces, hand carved masks from La Cote D’Ivoire, etc. I did not know how to react to it.
When I got there, I thought it was closed. The place was dead quiet. I spent about two hours and all I could kept on hearing was the occasional chatter of the employees. No one else came in and from the looks of things, it did not seem like the museum is heavily patronized. However, that did not deter me from enjoy the art and learning my history. I was sad not to know a lot about the history of Ghana, despite having studied history of Africa and Ghana at a point in time in my life. There is just so much out there, that is ours and we should be proud of.

Fertility dolls from the Ashanti Of Ghana
Fertility dolls from the Ashanti Of Ghana

National Pride.
I used to be one of the people who did not see the importance of history. Well, I would kindly like to educate you should you fall in this group. History instills in the people a sense of national pride. Pause! This is not theoretical but very practical. Let’s consider the United States of America. I don’t think anyone is ignorant of the sense of pride Americans derive from being American. This is all because of how they have celebrated their history, making every citizen respects that history and want be a part of the history.
Now why can’t Ghanaians adopt that? We have successfully imitated their eating and dressing habits but why can’t we learn to be proud of our history just as they are? Please, let’s take interest in our history and culture, so we can be inspired and motivated by it.

Ghanaian currency from the past
Ghanaian currency from the past
Ghanaian currency from the past.
Ghanaian currency from the past.

Contemporary Art.
I managed to chance upon an art exhibition by contemporary Ghanaian artist. The collection consisted of paintings by Ablade Glover, Amon Kotei, Kobina Bucknor and other prominent Ghanaian artist. I honestly do not know what to say about this. My pictures may be able to describe the richness of the art but certainly not the experience. Art is life and the exhibition confirmed Ghanaians are marvelous at art.

Should you happen to be in Accra, try to visit the museum. You might learn something you never knew. Please be proud of your history!

 

 

<Written by Hakeem Adam
Photography by Hakeem Adam/>.

Second Anniversary

Freddie Joachim x Wait

Two years!

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When I began this,  I had not thought so far ahead. I doubted myself so much back then and I doubted I’d make it this for. Initially,  it was a platform for me to share my intimate and stirring thoughts I had scribbled illegibly behind notebooks in high school.  It was and still is a stage for me to inspire and be inspired, grow and learn and perfect this art I am naturally drawn to.
There is more growth to come. I have planned a reform, or better still, an evolution. Moving forward, whilst staying true to the core values that got me here.
It is an amazing feeling each time I post something. I am actually surprised that someone takes time read what I write. I can’t Thank y’all enough. I could try by continuing to give you that cherished content. 
This blog, on some dark days, has been the only thing holding me together. I’ve met amazing people through this outlet,  written more than I can be proud of. So thank you for making this true.
-From a simple heart, old soul and iridescent tounge.
Hakeem.

Happy Second Anniversary on this blog.

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Photo credit : Damaris Danso.